Integrity

To me, integrity is one of the most important things a person can have.  All the values I’ve done monthly quote collations of are important, don’t get me wrong, but integrity is definitely near the top of the list.  It often requires many of the other virtues to enact.  In its simplest form, it is being true to yourself and doing the right thing, even when that is hard or detrimental.

It’s important to me in my personal life, but it’s also really important to me professionally.  Believe it or not, lawyers have an incredibly strict code of ethics.  One of my jobs is regulating practitioners who fall short or outright violate that code.  The code makes it clear that our first duty is to the court, and our second to the client.  Even if it hurts your client, you cannot mislead the court; even if it hurts you, you must serve your client to the best of your ability.  So, despite what TV may suggest, a lawyer (in Australia, at least) cannot go in front of the court and argue that their client is innocent of a crime if the client has told the lawyer that they are guilty.  If a client tells you one thing, you cannot tell the court another, and if your client insists that you must, you need to withdraw from the case, no matter how many dollarydoos you’ll get by staying in it.

There’s a whole bunch of other things in that code that we have to uphold – we have to be courteous, not bring the profession into disrepute, act in a timely manner, etc.

I’m really passionate about this, so it bothers me massively when I see people (particularly my fellow lawyers) breaching our ethical code, failing to uphold or enforce the law, or generally taking the easy way out just because the hard way is, well, hard.  My family and colleagues have had to sit through several rants recently when I got outraged that someone was behaving in a way that I did not think demonstrated integrity.  I hope I never do lose that outrage, even if it bores the people around me, because this is important.

As a result, this is a month I was really quite excited to do the quotes for.

Please excuse my cover picture of the doughnut, by the way.  I use a free stock photo engine for my cover photos, and the only thing for “integrity” was a picture of circuit boards, so in the end I had to go with “goodness”, which offered me many pictures of attractive men and one of a doughnut.  I’m pretty into doughnuts, so I figured that at least that would be true to myself, which is part of integrity…so, yes.  A doughnut is now the symbol of integrity.

One final side-note: I’ve decided to start linking the author of the quote to a short thing about them in case you like a quote and want to find out more about the person who said it.  Let me know in the comments if that is useful or just unnecessary and boring.

Anyway, the quotes.

  1. “Supporting the truth, even when it is unpopular, shows the capacity for honesty and integrity.”  – Steve Brunkhorst
  2. “One of your most prized possessions is integrity; if this is you, then you should never compromise it.” – Byron Pulsifer
  3. “Power really is a test of character.  In the hands of a person of integrity, it is a tremendous benefit; in the hands of a tyrant, it causes terrible destruction.”  – John Maxwell
  4. “Make living your life with absolute integrity and kindness your first priority.” – Richard Carlson
  5. “Live so that when your children think of fairness, caring and integrity, they think of you.” – H. Jackson Brown Jr
  6. “Be impeccable with your word.  Speak with integrity.  Say only what you mean.  Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others.  Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.” – Miguel Angel Ruiz
  7. “Admitting one’s own faults is the first step to changing them, and it is a demonstration of true bravery and integrity” – Philip Johnson (If I have correctly attributed this quote, I recognise the irony of quoting a Nazi sympathiser and possible Nazi agent who was utterly lacking in integrity, and I think it is important to acknowledge that there is absolutely no integrity in just paying lip service to the concept.  If I’ve attributed this wrongly, then I apologise to the Philip Johnson who actually said it and sincerely hope he isn’t a Nazi.)
  8. “The personal cost of keeping your own ethics sound and true may seem a bit of a burden at times but that is a minimal price to pay to be true to yourself.  There is absolutely no advantage to changing or altering a set of ethics that portray a person of value and integrity.” – Byron Pulsifer
  9. “When you make a commitment to yourself, do so with the clear understanding that you’re pledging your integrity.” – Stephen Covey
  10. “A single lie destroys a whole reputation of integrity.” – Baltasar Gracian
  11. “One of the truest tests of integrity is its blunt refusal to be compromised.” – Chinua Achebe
  12. “Six eseential qualities that are the key to success: sincerity, personal integrity, humility, courtesy, wisdom, charity.” – Dr William Menninger
  13. “Having a grateful disposition brings about other virtues, including generosity, compassion, humility, joy, wisdom, trust and integrity.” – Bree Miller
  14. “We learned about honesty and integrity – that the truth matters…that you don’t take shortcuts or play by your own set of rules…and success doesn’t count unless you earn it fair and square.” – Michelle Obama
  15. “Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.”  – C. S. Lewis
  16. “A life lived with integrity – even if it lacks the trappings of fame and fortune – is a shining star in whose light others my follow in the years to come.” – Denis Waitley
  17. “You can’t, in sound morals, condemn a man for taking care of his own integrity.  It is his clear duty.” – Joseph Conrad
  18. “Integrity is making sure that the things you do and the things you say are in alignment.” – Katrina Mayer
  19. “With integrity, you have nothing to fear, since you have nothing to hide. With integrity, you will do the right thing, so you will have no guilt.” – Zig Ziglar
  20. “Characterise people by their actions and you will never be fooled by their words.” – Anonymous
  21. “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters .” – Albert Einstein
  22. “Knowing what’s right doesn’t mean much unless you do what’s right.” – Franklin Roosevelt
  23. “People may doubt what you say but they will always believe what you do.” – Anonymous
  24. “Real integrity is doing the right thing, knowing that nobody is going to know whether you did it or not.” – Oprah Winfrey
  25. “To know what is right and not do it is the worst cowardice.” – Confucius
  26. “To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” – William Shakespeare
  27. “What is left when honour is lost?” – Publilius Syrus
  28. “No one can be happy who has been thurst outside the pale of turth.  And there are two ways that one can be removed from this realm: by lying, or by being lied to.” – Seneca
  29. “There are seven things that will destroy us: wealth without work; pleasure without conscience; knowledge without character; religion with sacrifice; politics without principle; science without humanity; business without ethics.” – Gandhi
  30. “May integrity and uprightness guard me as I wait for you.” – Psalm 25:2

What is the most valuable virtue for you?

 

May Gratitude

As my regular readers know, this year I have set myself the challenge of thinking of ten things to be grateful for each month.  Endometriosis can be so devastating and all-consuming that there are days when it doesn’t feel like there is anything good or untainted by it.  By doing this, I hope to train my brain to keep looking for the good and the hopeful.  So, for the month of May I am grateful for:-

1)  The right to vote

Person Dropping Paper On Box
Image description: a shadowed hand puts a folded piece of paper into a sealed box with a slit cut in the top.  

In Australia, non-Aboriginal women didn’t gain suffrage at a Commonwealth level until 1902.  Aboriginal people, male and female, were denied suffrage in Commonwealth elections until 1962.

I may not like election periods, and I may not be 100% enthused by the ideas of any of our political parties, but I am very grateful that I get to have my say regardless.  It may not count for much and it may not change the fate of the country, but it is part of something bigger and more important that ultimately dictates what direction we will go in as a nation for the next few years.  It is powerful and important.

2)  Clever creatives

Every day most of us consume some sort of media for entertainment.  I personally love snuggling up on the sofa with my husband, a cosy blanket, and one of our animals, and watching, reading, or listening to something that catches my imagination.  I am so grateful to the people who come up with the ideas for books, tv, movies, podcasts and music.  They are clever and talented and fascinating and their imaginations are vital to supporting mine.

3)  Good doctors

Red and Black Stethoscope
Image description: a coiled stethoscope and red enamel heart on a reflective white surface.  

My last post detailed my recent adventures with the local GPs in my attempt to get rid of my sinus infection (finally gone!).  I may not be enthused about one the GPs mentioned in that post, but I am overwhelmingly grateful for the good doctor who sorted me out in the end.  They are worth their weight in gold.  I propose kidnapping and cloning.

Disclaimer: I do not advocate kidnapping people and subjecting them to scientific experiments.

4)  My mother came home

Readers of this blog will know how much I rely on my mother when I am having a bad flare or just feeling particularly wussy.  She was in the UK for all of April, but she came back in early May and I cannot properly articulate how much safer and more comfortable I feel knowing she is in the same city as me.

5)  Chai lattes

Six White Ceramic Mugs
Image description: a top-down view of six mugs with different shades of coffee in them.  

It’s a really small thing, but they make me happy, all spicy and creamy and warm and frothy.  I think it’s important to appreciate the small things as well, after all.  I’m lucky enough to work within a very short walk of two cafes that serve them.  One is sweeter and uses the best soy milk brand in Australia, in my humble opinion (Bonsoy), and the other is spicier and more flavourful, though less creamy.  So not only do I get my chai lattes, I get choices too.  Happy me.

6)  Mutual interests

How good is it when you meet someone and you both love the same stuff and can talk about it for ages?  I wrote my Arts thesis on feminism in vampire novels (or the lack thereof), and it turns out that one of my colleagues studied similar topics when she was at uni.  She also loves cats, video games, and fantasy novels.  Talking to her is endlessly fun.  All my colleagues are fantastic, funny, intelligent, kind people, so it’s great to be able to connect on another level as well and make good friends.

7)  Being the “victim” of (really good) culinary experiments

My mother-in-law is a very keen cook who loves to change up recipes and make them suitable for my dietary requirements, so I have recently been the willing victim of some of her most delicious experiments.  Picture, if you will, cannelloni stuffed with sweet potato, spinach, tofu ricotta and roast hazelnuts, a Moroccan-style roast vegetable bake with creamy eggplant and succulent zucchini, and a lemony-shortbread tart case stuffed with eggplant, pea, and basil goodness and topped with roasted pine nuts.

8)  Cat snuggles

My poor Max had to have dental surgery in late May.  Normally, due to yowling like a banshee and smacking doors repeatedly when he wants to get through them, he sleeps in the garage at night, because otherwise he’ll do the above regularly while we are trying to sleep.  However, the garage is a little chilly, so after his op he had to sleep in the spare room, and to stop him yowling, so did I.  The non-good part of this is that Max doesn’t just sleep the night through like a sensible person, and likes to walk back and forth over my face with little chirps to let me know he was still awake and enjoying himself (he comments on everything).  The good part was, when he wasn’t doing that, he was snuggled under the blankets with me with my arms around him, all warm and soft and purring because he loves me and he loves cuddles.  It’s a wonderful thing to be loved by an animal, especially when they want to be snuggled like a teddy bear.

9)  Good computer games

Image result for the forest
Image description: a pair of legs in a blue skirt lie at an awkward angle on the ground outside.  There are little plants all around.  Yellow text reads: The Forest.

Throughout May, I was particularly obsessed with a game called The Forest.  I’m not very good at it, partly because it is a horror game, and, as much as I love horror, I’m a total wuss.  The game is stunningly beautiful (it is set in the lush Canadian coastal forest) and also stunningly creepy (there are dripping, echoing caves, giggling cannibals, and horrifically deformed mutants).  The thought and care that has gone into the creation of both the world and the storyline is obvious, and the result is addictive.

10)  White privilege

To be clear, white privilege doesn’t mean that I have an easy life because I am white, or that I am a bad person because I am white.  It simply means that the same institutional barriers that non-white people face do not burden me.  People looking at me will never make assumptions that I am unintelligent, criminal or dangerous because of the colour of my skin.  Statistically I am going to live longer, get paid more, and have better opportunities.  People in power throughout the country are, by and large, the same racial background as me.

It is incredibly important to remember this, especially as the week of 27 May was Reconciliation Week.  Aboriginal people still face issues that I will likely never experience.  They are more likely to be illiterate, arrested, assaulted, homeless, and experience violence and addiction.  They still suffer racist abuse from white Australians, and their language and cultural traditions are being eroded.

I don’t mean to say by this that I am glad to not be Aboriginal.  That’s not it at all.  I don’t have any particular feelings about the colour of my skin.  What I am grateful for is the privilege that I experience as a result of it, even as I long for the day when that isn’t so.

Sorry for Being a Slacker

Hello, gentle reader.  I apologise for the lack of posts of late.  Like most people with a compromised immune system during flu season, I have managed to acquire myself my very own pet illness.

Thankfully, in this case, it isn’t flu.  It was a cold, and then it turned into another sinus infection, and it has just stayed that way for two weeks.  I anticipate that I will get at least one more before we kiss August goodbye, and I would not be surprised if I get multiple between now and then.

The super fun part of the infection, you’ll be surprised to learn, has not been the horrifically sore, swollen throat, the aching in my face that feels like goblins are trying to shove my eyes out of my sockets, or even the crushing exhaustion (I’m kind of used to that anyway).  It hasn’t even been the joint aches.

It’s been yet another disappointing encounter with a doctor.

I used to see this wonderful doctor at my local bulk-billing place who has consistently fixed every problem I have taken to him.  I trust him deeply.  Unfortunately, he only sees patients on a walk-in basis now, and I needed to actually book in.  I saw one doctor who is quite nice and who gave me the good antibiotics, but a week later I was still sick and getting worse so I went and saw another dude because the first doctor wasn’t available.

That doctor prescribed me weaker antibiotics, told me to use a treatment my favourite doctor had specifically told me was not beneficial and was possibly harmful, and then:-

  1. Said, “You don’t want a hysterectomy, we won’t do that for you” (I do want one);
  2. Told me there’s no need to go to the UK for a doctor because we have plenty of good ones here;
  3. Recommended a doctor who previously told me I couldn’t possibly have endometriosis so soon after my first surgery (I did);
  4. Told me that if my Australian specialist had refused to perform TPPE (he didn’t even know what it was) that’s because the surgeon knew what was best for me;

and just generally did his best to make me feel guilty about taking my medical care into my own hands with absolutely no understanding of what it took to do so.  Ok, that’s unfair – he was trying to be thorough and ensure that I was seeing someone for my endo – but he was unintentionally extremely condescending and made me feel like I had to defend my choices to change doctors and go to the UK to get surgery I literally could not get in Australia.

It’s another lesson in “if you don’t know the full story, stop judging.”

Yesterday I got sick of the weaker antibiotics not working and my sickness continuing to worsen, so I went as a walk-in and saw my favourite doctor.  He gave me the good stuff again.

Thank goodness for the good doctors.  Boo to the bad ones.

An Open Letter to Lifeline

CW: chronic pain, suicide

Other Australians may have seen an advert by Lifeline cropping up on our bus shelters, billboards and other media over the past few months.  I have a big problem with this advert.

This is it:

Image may contain: one or more people, text and closeup
A blue image of an adult’s hand holding a child’s hand.  The text reads  “Hold On Pain Ends.  We’re here for you.  Call: 13 11 14 lifeline.org.au”.

I think my issue with this as a sufferer of chronic pain should be fairly self-explanatory, but if it isn’t, please see the letter I have written to Lifeline below.

Dear Lifeline

I have recently noticed a number of adverts for Lifeline with the slogan “HOPE: Hold on, pain ends.”  This was also posted to your facebook page on 5 March 2019. I want to ask that you reconsider this slogan.

Whilst I am certain that your intention is good and that these words are important to many people considering suicide, I wonder if you have fully considered the potential impact of these words on the portion of the population for whom pain doesn’t end – those of us with chronic illness, disability or chronic pain.

In 2018 a study was done in the US examining the impact of chronic pain as a factor in suicides.  It showed that chronic pain was a factor in 9% of suicides.  Australian doctors have linked an increase in suicides amongst young women to chronic pelvic pain diseases such as endometriosis.

I am chronically ill and live with daily pain.  One of my diseases is endometriosis.  My illnesses are likely to impact me for the rest of my life, unless I have major surgery that comes with its own raft of difficult side-effects.  As long as I have these diseases, I am likely to continue to experience daily pain.  Every time I walk past your advert, I am reminded of this fact.  My pain won’t end.  It’s a further twist of the knife that is the reality of being chronically ill.  Every time I see your ad, I feel a stab of bitterness, sadness and despair.

I wonder if it might not be even worse for someone with chronic pain who is suicidal.  They might see your sign and think, “If pain ending is a reason not to commit suicide, perhaps the fact that my pain won’t end is a reason I should.”

Your advert fails to acknowledge those of us living in daily physical pain.  At best, it ignores the risk of suicide amongst the chronic pain community.  At worst, it suggests that lives with unending pain aren’t worth living.

I know from discussions with others in the community that I am not the only person who feels this way.  On a personal level, I don’t know how many more times I can bear to walk past your advert without bursting into tears.  There is one right outside my work – I see it several times a day and it doesn’t get any less hurtful.

I know that it wasn’t Lifeline’s intention to exclude or hurt anyone, but that is the practical effect of this advert and that is why I am writing to beg you to remove that slogan as soon as possible.  Please consider the impact it has on disabled and chronically ill people.  We are often forgotten and excluded in so many little ways that add up to a culture of discrimination and inaccessibility.  Please don’t contribute to that.

Kind regards

Some people might suggest that I’m overreacting.  Poo to you, I say.  Poo to you.  Words matter.  Words can hurt.  These words do.

Some might say, “Well, of course Lifeline didn’t mean that it applies to you.”  That’s the point!  They don’t say that!  They just make a blanket statement that completely excludes the chronically ill.

If you share my feelings about this advert I would strongly encourage you to also write to Lifeline and ask them to change this advert and ensure that it is replaced with something with a better, more inclusive message.  Please feel free to use my letter as a template.

I have requested a response.  I’ll let you know if I get one.

More Quotable Quotes

A while ago I did a post on 10 quotes that really summed up some of the experiences we have with endometriosis/chronic illness.  Recently, a lot of similar quotes have been popping up in my Pinterest feed, so I thought this might be a good time to do another one of those posts.

1)  “When I finally find a pain-free position…but then I have to pee.”  

All the damn time!

The quote is superimposed on an image of James Van Der Beek ugly-crying.

This one doesn’t really need an explanation, but boy, is it true (and frustrating).

2)  “Fake it til you make it doesn’t work with chronic illness”

MS, Fibro, Lupus, and the list goes on and on.... Chronic Debilitating Painful Illnesses

Image is a tumblr post by thatchronicfeeling.  It reads:

“‘Fake it till you make it’ dosen’t work with chronic illness.

Instead, the options are:

‘Fake it till you are so ill you can’t get out of bed’

‘Fake it till you have a flare’

‘Fake it till you have a flare, continue to fake it till you’re hospitalised’

OR

‘Accept that you have one or more chronic illnesses, adapt accordingly and look after yourself.'”  

I suspect most of us are guilty of trying to fake it til we make it far too many times, largely because there are enormous societal and economic pressures to do so, even though we know it doesn’t work and isn’t conducive to long-term health.

3) The Most Annoying Thing

Indeed, I still try though. Now and then, PIZZA!!!

Image reads: “The thing that kills me about chronic illness is that you can do everything right and still be sick.  You can be on the best medications, eat the best food, exercise seven days a week, sleep eight hours every night, and still be sick.  You can follow every rule, do everything your [sic] supposed to, and still be sick.”

You’re telling me.  I flew halfway around the planet to get the best surgery currently available only to discover I have another underlying condition that the surgery can’t treat.  I sleep ten or twelve hours some days and I’m still fatigued beyond enduring.

On the other hand, I did go to my Bangladeshi friend’s house the other night and eat all the high-FODMAP food, but honestly, if you could taste her mum’s dahl, you’d eat it if it killed you.

4) Of Mice and Men

Quote, 'Of Mice and Men'

Image is a quote from Of Mice and Men: “It’s just a constant battle: me against my body; my passions and my dreams and what I want to do with my life, against what I’m physically able to do.”

This really hits home.  As I write I’m supposed to be at beautiful Pearl Beach catching up with a dear friend whom I don’t see nearly enough.  Instead, I’m at home in my pjs because I couldn’t handle the journey.

5) I want to be enough

Chronically ill person

Image reads: As a chronically ill person, I don’t want to be told I can do anything if I put my mind to it.  I want to know that what I can do is enough.”

Absolutely.  It doesn’t matter how determined I am to be a prima ballerina when I can barely make it to the gym twice a week through fatigue and pain.  Rather than being told “you can do anything!”, which kind of rubs it in our faces that we can’t, tell us that we are doing really well as we are (because we are).  

6) Surprise!

Funny because it’s true

Meme of a cat face on a background partitioned into six shades of blue.  Texts reads:

“Me: so what are we going to do with my life?

Body: It’s a surprise!”

It sure it, body.  It sure is.

7)  Waste of spoons

Said every person who is chronically ill.

Image reads: Why waste spoons on shaving your legs?

I’ve had many a day in between laser sessions where I have thrown out my skirt or dress plans in favour of trousers because shaving requires far, far too many spoons.

If you can’t bear the sensation of leg hair want to know more about removal options, have a squiz at this post where I evaluate the pros and cons of a few different choices.

8) Competing Desires

yes

Image reads: I am a person who wants to do a lot of things trapped in a body of a person who wants to sleep a lot.

Never a truer word was said.

9) A Fully Functioning Body

Image result for funny chronic illness memes

Image is a tumblr post by thefairiegirl.  It is a picture of a shocked lego-person in glasses with the text:

“When I see someone with a fully functioning body:”

and the lego person says, “I’ve always wanted one of those.”

Wouldn’t it be nice?

10) Fatigue

"You don't know what fatigue is until you've had to rest after taking a shower." Life with chronic illness. Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Lyme Disease.

Image is from someecards.  A vintage image of a lady in a bathtub on a blue background, with text that reads: “You don’t know what fatigue is until you’ve had to rest after taking a shower.”

I mostly take baths now for that exact reason, and I still have to rest afterwards.

What quote resonates with you the most?

If you enjoyed this post and want to see more of these quotes, follow me at https://www.pinterest.com.au/bubblesinthebrain/ and look for my Endometriosis board.

Happy Christmas!

Whatever my dear readers are celebrating at this time of year, I wish you all the happiest of days with no pain or stress.

For my fellow Christians, this may not be the exact anniversary of Jesus’ birth, but remembering that awesome event is of such importance. His birth is a symbol of hope, and hope is one thing us sickies will always need.

Merry Christmas to all! 🎄

Hello from Hospital

Hello, dear readers. I’m so sorry I’ve not been posting; I’ve been fully immersed in holidaying, seeing family, and, of course, preparing for my operation.

Said operation occurred this morning UK time, and I am now recovering.

Once I’m discharged I’ll do a post about the experience, including the differences between the UK and Australian approach. Right now, though, I can hear sleep calling my name again (she won’t leave me alone!) so I’ll say TTFN and give you all a proper update when I’ll less drugged up.

Wish me well, internet friends.

Flying with Endometriosis Part 4: Things to Consider

For many people, flying is already a nightmare.  For people with endometriosis, there’s an added layer of difficulty.  In this multi-part series, “Flying with Endometriosis”, I want to talk about some of things we can do to make travel a bit easier.

Sorry about my recent absence! My computer is utterly broken and I’m still adjusting to the app so there has been a bit of a break. I’ll try and return to more regular posting now, noting I’ll jet-setting off this very day, but expect posts to have a slightly funny format whilst I familiarise myself with the WordPress app.

Ok, we’ve gone through our pre-flight checklist, packed our carry-ons for maximum comfort, and dressed to impress our endo bellies. What else do we need to do?

This is less a post and more a list of things to consider for your trip that didn’t really fit into my previous three articles, but are still really important. I’ve divided them up into topics below.

Luggage

Is your carry-on manageable, or will it put pressure on sore joints if you have a flare-up? Think about the type of bag that is most comfortable for you. Although I’ve gone for a messenger bag for its capacity and great storage, it’s probably not the best choice if I start to end up in pain as the weight is not easily distributed across my body. A backpack or small wheeled case (although I often find I’m too tall to manage these comfortably) would be the more sensible option.

Is your main luggage easy to manoeuvre? I prefer a suitcase with four wheels to the traditional two. Firstly, it is easier for my tall self to handle without it running into my heels, and secondly, it trundles along happily next to me with minimal effort – great if my pain starts to flare. A large rucksack/hiking pack is not so great for me as it presses on my lower back and requires me to bear a fair amount of weight, which my battered bod doesn’t love.

Have you packed it for best weight distribution? Remember, heavy stuff near the wheels, light stuff at the other end. I find packing cubes invaluable for organising everything inside the suitcase.

Arrival

Is your hotel close by? After a long flight, it isn’t always a good idea to jump straight into sightseeing. You want to dump your luggage and explore in freedom, and possibly get a bath or shower to help relax your pelvis and work out any knots. Make sure that your hotel is either possible for you to walk to without inducing a flare-up, or that you can easily acquire transport there.

Have you scouted out local food options? If you are on the endo diet, low FODMAP diet or similar, you may want to know in advance where you can safely eat to prevent you having to go traipsing round the city in search of options when you are exhausted from your flight. A lot of travel bloggers and the like will turn up their nose at people who aren’t prepared to try all the wildest local cuisine, but it isn’t always practical when you have dietary restrictions. Don’t feel bad if you can’t or just don’t want to – food is not the only part of travel and you are not a “bad” tourist if you can’t handle the local food.

Are you near a doctor or chemist? Make a point of knowing the closest one to your hotel. Most chronically ill people are going to be pretty well-prepared to manage their conditions on the go, but things can go unexpectedly wrong, luggage can get lost or stolen, and medications can get confiscated by unsympathetic security staff. You never know when you will need a bit of medical assistance so better safe than sorry.

Tourism

Are you confident you can manage the activities you have scheduled? Make sure you know the refund policies of any booked activities just in case, and make sure you know your limits. I love guided tours as a good way to familiarise myself with a new city, but many involve a lot of walking. If you think it will be too much, consider a tour that involves transport such as a car, bus, bicycle, rickshaw, boat or tuk tuk.

Have you scoped out wheelchair hire? Many people with endo won’t need to fall back on a wheelchair, but I often do. Knowing where I can pick one up offers me far more flexibility than I would otherwise have.

If you do need a chair, are the places you want to see wheelchair-friendly, and will getting there in a chair be an option? You want to make sure that the chair helps you, not limits you. Using it as much as possible in accessible locations will ensure that you have the energy and spoons to get around less accessible locations on other days.

Do you have a couple of catch-phrases in the local language? Being able to say “help” and “I don’t speak X, do you speak English?” may just make the difference between being alone and in pain and being able to get the help you need. You don’t need to memorise the phrase book, but a couple of sentences can be so useful.

Do you have a map, either physical or on your phone? When I get a flare and have serious pain, my ability to think, plan and act is totally compromised. Being able to access the map function on my phone and have it tell me where to go is so useful. All I have to do is push through and follow instructions rather than try and navigate my way back to bed through an unfamiliar city.

What other steps would you take, endo-havers? Anything you always try to think about in your travels? Let me know in the comments!

Error: Blog Not Found

Hi all

I’m having some technical difficulties here at Bubbles central but I have some great posts coming. The travel series will continue and I’ll take you on another little trip with a Review of two of the ACT’s October festivals. New content coming…as soon as my computer remembers how to computer. 😩